On Location with Poldark: Trail Running & Walking in Poldark Country Botallack Cornwall.

Cameras and sound equipment next to 'Ross Poldarks' mine.

Cameras and sound equipment next to ‘Ross Poldarks’ mine.

The airing of the new adaptation of Winston Graham’s Poldark reminded me that I still had photos to upload from my summer trail running around West Cornwall (OS Map 102 Land’s End). The South West Coast Path around West Cornwall is fantastic any time of year. But in summer with the wild flowers out last year it was exceptional. The icing on the cake was stumbling across the set of the BBC’s latest adaptation of Poldark.

Props for the Poldark set being stored ready for use in a field near Botallack.

Props for the Poldark set being stored ready for use in a field near Botallack.

When I arrived they were on a break from filming and the security guard sunbathing against a Cornish hedge was more than happy for me to have a look around as long as I didn’t disturb him.

Continue reading

Spotlight on Bodmin Moor: Following the Liskeard Caradon Railway across the open moors.

Spotlight on Bodmin Moor: Following the Liskeard Caradon Railway across the open moors.

DSCN4749 (2)

Image showing the distinctive stone block sleepers lining the old moorland railway route. Stowe’s Hill and the Cheesewring are ahead and Sharptor is on the far right horizon.

The thought of running an abandoned rail line across the wild moors of Cornwall seems too good an opportunity to miss. This is why the remains of the Liskeard Caradon Railway are a must for any trail runner visiting the area. The railway was built to service the local metal mines and granite quarries in the 19th century during the height of the industrial revolution. The mines are now long gone and the wild moor has once again reclaimed the wilderness. However if you look closely you can still trace the scar of the old railway across the moor. Stone sleepers once holding the rails in place now line the route like headstones.

Continue reading

The Mid Cornwall Yachting Trail (Run/walk): Restronguet Creek, Mylor Creek and Penryn River

The Mid Cornwall Yachting Trail:
(Restronguet Creek, Mylor Creek and Penryn River)

Distance: 12 miles
Max height: 68 metres
Min height: 2 metres
Total accent: 336 metres
Designation: Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

OS Maps 104 Redruth and St Agnes and 105 Falmouth and Mevagissey both cover the route.

Some wooded and cross county tracks, followed by miles of flat off road trails following Restronguet Creek, Mylor Creek and the Penryn River estuary with outstanding views across Carrick Roads and Falmouth Bay, Cornwall.

mylor boats

Continue reading

Spotlight on the Lizard: Kynance Cove to Cadgwith. Hiking or Trail Running.

Spotlight on the Lizard.
Kynance Cove to Cadgwith.

cropped-cropped-cadwith.jpg

Cadgwith Cove

Start point: Kynance Cove car park
Turn around point: Cadgwith.
Route stats (out and back)
Distance: 11 miles
Highest point: 55m
Lowest point: 9m
Total accent: 650m
Total decent: 650m

[Courtesy of Bing Maps and Ordinance Survey]

[Courtesy of Bing Maps and Ordinance Survey]

Buy your Ordinance Survey Map from Amazon here: OS Explorer 103 The Lizard.

As we get out of the car the air is fresh, with a very light breeze coming off the sea. The early morning sun covers the cliffs in a weak golden glow. The sea is calm, a deep sapphire blue with little wavelets sparkling like glitter in the morning sun. The early start at Kynance Cove car park saw us arriving before the car parking attendant. Lucky there are no gates on the car park. We apply sun cream and check the straps on our packs. Then we walk across the car park to join the coast path. We take about 50 steps at a light jog before being stopped by a herd of highland cattle with calves on the path (these cattle are used by the National Trust to manage the vegetation). Their dark brown hair matted and damp in the morning dew. We walk past keeping away from the young. The cattle chew on regardless giving us little attention and we are soon breaking into a light jog. The trail is muddy and rutted, but today baked dry by the summer sun. We make good progress and are soon into a nice rhythm.

Continue reading